Sad and a Little Pissy

In my last post, I described the June 14th lining check as “something we had to get through.” I had no idea what a loaded statement that was…

During the ultrasound, the tech said my lining was measuring a little over 6 mm. I immediately turned to Brennen, my human Wikipedia on female reproduction. He gave me a “That’s ok” nod as the tech proceeded to measure my follicles. They needed to be small, and they were. A win! As I got dressed, Brennen was busy on his phone, looking up what my lining should be. I had never had a lining quite that thin. I usually measured around 9, so a thin lining wasn’t a potential problem on our radar that warranted any pre-requisite research. Before we walked out of the room, he said, “I think we’re OK. It’s still growing, and you haven’t even started progesterone.” So with that reassurance and my trend of problem-free uterine linings, I assumed we would get good news that afternoon. I sent a few thumbs-up selfie Snapchats to my friends and family and headed back to work.

Then around 4:00, I answered the phone, with pen and paper in hand for my transfer directions, and heard Nurse Memphis say, “So that lining isn’t really where we need it to be.” ARGH! “I had a feeling,” I admitted, although I had tried my best to ignore it all day. Doctor’s orders were to stay on the Estrace for one more week to see if the lining thickened and to come to Memphis for a lining check. The nurse told me, “Even if it’s still a little thin, it may be pretty enough to proceed.” So that was the plan – keep popping the estradiol pills in hope that I develop a fluffy, pretty lining. Transfer postponed.

For a week, I did just as Dr. Memphis directed. I also took some advice from my acupuncturist and started drinking Raspberry Leaf tea and eating iron-rich foods that would either thicken my lining or clog my arteries. Then Tuesday night, we made the trip to Memphis.

We were only at the clinic for about 20 minutes – just long enough for me to get my blood drawn for estradiol and progesterone checks and for a date with “Wanda.” I don’t think I have ever been so nervous about an ultrasound. We’re getting pretty good at knowing what the uterus looks like on the screen, so when it popped up, we both perked up and said, “There it is!” It was beautiful, according to the ultrasound tech. Three pretty layers and measuring at 8.75 mm – right where it needed to be. We drove back home on a high note.

Later that afternoon, my phone lit up with a call from Memphis. “You’re lining looked really good,” the nurse said. “Duh!” I proudly thought. Then came the but. My progesterone was high which indicated that I had ovulated. Transfer cancelled.

We all know someone who got pregnant while on birth control, right? Birth control loads your body up with estrogen early in your cycle, which is supposed to shut your ovaries down and keep you from ovulating. But even with all that estrogen in your system, in rare cases, an egg will spring forward from a follicle and send you into ovulation. Thus the story of a “birth control baby.” Estrace has the same task before a transfer. It’s estrogen, and it shuts my ovaries down. But there are those rare cases, and this month, I was one of them. I mean, seriously?! My ovaries have super powers that defy the odds and release an egg amidst an ass-ton of estrogen. But unfortunately the buck stops there. Otherwise, we wouldn’t be in this infertile situation in the first place.

So anyway, it’s back to the starting line for us. I’ll start my cycle in a week or two then proceed with birth control…again. Then comes the Estrace…again. This time around, Doc is putting me on Lupron injections that will (hopefully) keep me from ovulating.  But first, we wait.

Before I get into what this means for us emotionally, let me say that this is not an invitation to a pity party.  I promised myself that I would never write a blog post about what not to say to an infertile couple because 1) there are a gazillion articles about this subject out there already and 2) we’re never going to open up the conversation about infertility if we keep shutting it down with rules. But I will say this – sometimes the best thing someone can say is, “This sucks.” Just a recognition of how shitty the situation is goes a long way! My best friend is my best friend because when I share bad news, she sends me memes of cats saying curse words! And encourage us with reminders of how strong we are. Yes, that may sound a little self-absorbed, but if people are going to feel sorry for us, let encouragement grow from that pity, not sad puppy dog eyes and an empty sentiment about how everything happens for a reason.

Sorry if I sound pissy. But heck, I am pissy. I’m tired. I’m frustrated. I’m beaten down. We both are. Yesterday was the closest I’ve felt to giving up. I know we won’t give up, but that hope we had after a successful retrieval and a positive test (even though it resulted in a miscarriage) fades a little more with each cancelled transfer. We’ll get better, though. We’ll cope and push through. We just have to let this sadness run its course. One of the most inspirational quotes I’ve found during my IVF Pinterest-ing didn’t tell me about trusting God’s timing, having hope, finding strength, or believing in miracles. It simply told me it’s ok to be sad.Own the Sadness

So that’s what I’m going to do right now…be sad and own the hell out of it.

(And yeah, I’ll probably be a little pissy too.)

We Set a Date and Took a Shot

I HAVE A THICK UTERINE LINING, and I want to shout it from the roof tops!  My monitoring appointment yesterday confirmed a lining of approximately 9mm, which means my body, more specifically my uterus, is ready to take on an embryo.  And with that news, we were able to set a date for our frozen embryo transfer.  Drum roll please…Tuesday, November 15th!

But first, progesterone.

For the past two weeks, I have been on an estrogen regimen – 6mg of Estrace daily – to keep me from ovulating and to support the growth of my lining.  Good job, Estrace.  I forgive you for the mood swings and heart burn.  I’ll continue to take Estrace through the transfer, but to ensure that my lining doesn’t get too thick I have to add my little friend PIO (progesterone in oil) to the mix.  PIO is an intramuscular injection, which means big needle in the hip.  And our first injection was tonight. In fact, as I write this, I’m sitting in the car with my right cheek pressed firmly against my heated seat on our way to a steak dinner.

This is the first time in this entire process, including Round 1, that I was shaking from nervousness.  I knew too well what was ahead.  When Brennen walked through the door, I tried to mask my nerves and bravely said, “Ok, I’m ready. Progesterone, now.” It didn’t help when he started mumbling, “Oh my gosh we’re really doing this.”  Then, I hear the voice of a stranger in my house.  A lady on YouTube was giving Brennen instructions on how to give a PIO injection.  Her voice…not so comforting at the time.

As Brennen reached for the Sharpie to temporarily tattoo my backside with injection targets, he said “Now, where exactly do I inject?” Brennen called my uncle (a nurse) for advice.  I heard the words “6 inches from the top of the butt crack…” and saw Brennen go for the tape measure.  This just kept getting better.  He drew the first circle, put an X through it, and drew another.  Finally, we were ready, and gave and took that progesterone like total champs.  When the needle was out, Brennen asked me how it was.  Tears filled my eyes.  They weren’t sad tears.  They weren’t happy tears.  They were just tears…because here we are…5 days from transfer…and wanting this to work so badly.

So, the plan is to continue PIO until I take a pregnancy test; further instructions will follow depending on the results.  I’ll also take an antibiotic and a steroid, Prednisone, for a few days for transfer prep.  The antibiotic is to help ward off any infections from the procedure, and the Prednisone is administered to address any inflammation that may result from implantation.  Aside from medicine, our hotel is booked, and our bags will be packed by the end of the weekend.  I’ll have to be on bed rest for a couple days following the transfer, so I’ve opted to just stay in Memphis.  My mom will be babysitting me so that Brennen can get back to work.  And that means for those few days we’re in Memphis, she’ll be the one injecting me with PIO. That should be interesting…

Well, that’s about it for now!  My tears have dried up. My butt is starting to feel better. And I have a steak dinner waiting on me. We like to celebrate.  Let the countdown to November 15th begin!